Sensory Processing

Boy and girl child hugging for picture

Sensory Processing Survey

Complete the appropriate survey for your child to help guide you to your next step.
Sensory Preschool: Infants

Sensory Preschool Age Survey – Infants

Infants
1. Dislikes touch or cuddling, arches back when held?(Required)
2. Doesn't develop a regular sleep pattern?(Required)
3. Doesn't develop a regular feeding schedule?(Required)
4. Dislikes tummy time, has trouble lifting head?(Required)
5. Delayed milestone development?(Required)
6. Gets fussy in a car seat and/or baby swing?(Required)
7. Takes an unusually long time to feed?(Required)
8. Excessive need to suck? (increased feeds, relies on pacifier)(Required)
9. Acts overly sensitive to loud sounds or bright lights?(Required)
Sensory Preschool: Toddlers/Preschoolers

Sensory Preschool Age Survey – Toddlers/Preschoolers

Infants
1. Several temper tantrums a day, behavior extremes?(Required)
2. Difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep?(Required)
3. Does not explore playground?(Required)
4. Speech delays or difficult to understand?(Required)
5. Very picky eater?(Required)
6. Gross and fine motor delays?(Required)
7. Difficulty separating from parent?(Required)
8. Disconnected from environment?(Required)
9. Unusually high or low activity level?(Required)
Sensory School

Sensory School Age Survey

Does Your Child…
1. Hate having her hair washed, brushed, or cut?(Required)
2. Have "selecting hearing" or difficulty listening?(Required)
3. Resist certain foods/textures, "picky eaters"?(Required)
4. Complain about tags or "itchy clothes"?(Required)
5. Touch others too hard/"not know his own strength"?(Required)
6. HATE or LOVE being tickled or cuddled?(Required)
7. Tend to be clumsy or fall a lot?(Required)
8. Always run or walk on tiptoes?(Required)
9. Have trouble focusing/concentrating?(Required)
10. Act overly sensitive to loud sounds or bright lights?(Required)
11. Chew on everything? (shirts, erasers, nails, etc.)(Required)
12. Have a poor fine motor skills? (writing, cutting, etc.)(Required)
13. Have difficulty dressing himself?(Required)
14. Have trouble transitioning?(Required)
15. Refuse to or insist on going barefoot?(Required)
Sensory Preschool: Infants

Sensory Preschool Age Survey – Infants

Infants
1. Dislikes touch or cuddling, arches back when held?(Required)
2. Doesn't develop a regular sleep pattern?(Required)
3. Doesn't develop a regular feeding schedule?(Required)
4. Dislikes tummy time, has trouble lifting head?(Required)
5. Delayed milestone development?(Required)
6. Gets fussy in a car seat and/or baby swing?(Required)
7. Takes an unusually long time to feed?(Required)
8. Excessive need to suck? (increased feeds, relies on pacifier)(Required)
9. Acts overly sensitive to loud sounds or bright lights?(Required)
Sensory Preschool: Toddlers/ Preschoolers

Sensory Preschool Age Survey – Toddlers/Preschoolers

Infants
1. Several temper tantrums a day, behavior extremes?(Required)
2. Difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep?(Required)
3. Does not explore playground?(Required)
4. Speech delays or difficult to understand?(Required)
5. Very picky eater?(Required)
6. Gross and fine motor delays?(Required)
7. Difficulty separating from parent?(Required)
8. Disconnected from environment?(Required)
9. Unusually high or low activity level?(Required)
Sensory School

Sensory School Age Survey

Does Your Child…
1. Hate having her hair washed, brushed, or cut?(Required)
2. Have "selecting hearing" or difficulty listening?(Required)
3. Resist certain foods/textures, "picky eaters"?(Required)
4. Complain about tags or "itchy clothes"?(Required)
5. Touch others too hard/"not know his own strength"?(Required)
6. HATE or LOVE being tickled or cuddled?(Required)
7. Tend to be clumsy or fall a lot?(Required)
8. Always run or walk on tiptoes?(Required)
9. Have trouble focusing/concentrating?(Required)
10. Act overly sensitive to loud sounds or bright lights?(Required)
11. Chew on everything? (shirts, erasers, nails, etc.)(Required)
12. Have a poor fine motor skills? (writing, cutting, etc.)(Required)
13. Have difficulty dressing himself?(Required)
14. Have trouble transitioning?(Required)
15. Refuse to or insist on going barefoot?(Required)

Symptoms

Treatment

The frequency of treatment and interventions is dependent on each child’s individual issues. Consistency is the key to treatment and success. Some of the therapeutic tools that we use at Excel are:

To promote focus and attention, physical endurance and stamina, filtering of external and internal distractions, coordination and sequencing.

Developed by Patricia Wilbarger, M.Ed., OTR, FAOTA, an internationally recognized expert who specializes in the assessment and treatment of sensory defensiveness.

To improve auditory processing issues

To improve auditory processing issues

To improve visual defensiveness, balance and coordination

A good foundation of sensory integration is important to guide appropriate behavior, learn efficiently, sustain attention. and easily cope with the ordinary demands of everyday life. Children with sensory processing issues generally must work harder to achieve the necessary outcomes desired. Sensory processing is dynamic and may result in fluctuating performance or behavior which may also be frustrating. It often leaves the false impression that it is the child's "choice" and that they could do better if they just try harder.

Sensory integration refers to our ability to organize and process sensory input and to use that input to respond appropriately to a particular situation. Although we are all taught about our senses as children (hearing, smell, vision, taste, and touch) we are not made aware of the importance of our senses working together to help us get through each task in our day. We also have other senses that affect the way our brain work--our ability to sense movement and gravity.

Over 80% of the nervous system is involved in processing or organizing sensory input for our use. Sensory systems use receptors to pick up information that is then processed by the brain. Every sensation is a form of information. The nervous system uses the information to produce responses that adapt the body and mind to that information. Our brains are like computers. Sensory information is the data that goes in, and based on that data, we act appropriately or not within the environment. If the data is improperly entered into the computer. or there is a problem with the way the software processes the data, the computer cannot provide the correct solution. It is very much the same with our brain and nervous system. If the sensory information (data) is not perceived and interpreted correctly, our brain may also not provide the most correct or appropriate solution.

Although inadequate sensory "nourishment" can occur from inactivity (TV, computer, video games) more often this contributes to the problem and is not the cause. Most children with sensory integration dysfunction do not have brain damage. They have about as many neurons as other children; their problem is caused by interconnections that work in an irregular way. Therefore, sensory integration dysfunction will not show up on an MRI or other type of test that looks for brain damage or disease. It represents malfunction, not absence of function.

Sensations are processed at different levels of the brain and can influence any response. Children who have issues processing sensory information can look very different from one another based on the specific processing issue they may have. Good sensory processing is important for self-regulation of sleep cycles, mood, attention, behavior and eating. So, issues with sensory processing may result in children who have difficulty sleeping, that are moody or anxious, extremely fussy or frustrated, inattentive, have difficulty transitioning, or may have increased difficulty separating from their parents or interacting with their peers. These children may appear more intense or "high maintenance." Issues with sensory processing may also result in different types of learning issues or difficulties at school. There may be struggles with language, articulation, reading, math, organization, keeping up with homework assignments, etc. Since most children with sensory processing issues are average intelligence or above, this can be extremely frustrating for both the parent and student and may result in low self-esteem. Motor skills may also be problematic with sensory processing issues. There may be problems with gross and/or fine motor skills, balance, coordination, or sequencing. The child may exhibit difficulty with dressing/buttoning, scissor skills, or handwriting difficulties. Issues with sensory processing may be very specific or very broad and general. Although there are similarities in children with sensory processing issues, each child presents a little differently.

Toddler playing and smiling

Sensory Processing FAQS

Why is the home program so important?
Why is the home program so important? A home program continues to support nervous system organization and optimal function after the treatment session ends. Many therapeutic interventions require consistent and correct follow thru to effectively work and change function.
Is sensory integration (SI) treatment new and why have I not heard of it before?
Is sensory integration (SI) treatment new and why have I not heard of it before? SI theory and treatment was developed by Jean Ayers, Occupational Therapist in the 1960’s. Since then, research continues to validate the importance of sensory processing function in overall development. SI treatment is more popular on the East and West Coast than in Central U.S. Referrals for SI assessment and evaluation have increased significantly in the past 10 years.
Will insurance reimburse me for my therapy?
Will insurance reimburse me for my therapy? Evaluation and treatment reimbursement of our services is dependent on each individual’s policy. We are in network providers for BCBS and Traditional Medicaid. However, most insurance will reimburse a set percentage amount for out-of-network interventions. On average, our clients receive 50 to 70 percent reimbursement for evaluation or treatment. You can call our office or your insurance company directly for more information.

Let Us Help You

Together, we can help your kid nourish their skills and nurture their growth.